Running, Cycling, Climbing Trees, and Reading a Book While I'm Up There.

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President Franklin Delano Roosevelt’s proposed plan to modify the Supreme Court (SCOTUS) was voted down by the Senate. Chief Justice Charles Evans Hughes Court had repeatedly struck down key elements of FDR’s New Deal. FDR enacted the wide reaching program as an effort to end the Great Depression.

The legislation would have added six additional associate justices to the court all FDR appointees. This change would have created an immediate shift in the court’s philosophical makeup and neuter Chief Justice Hughes control over the court. Congress struck down these provisions of the Judicial Procedures Reform Bill. However, the Court did become more favorable to New Deal legislation making it clear that FDR’s message had been heard loud and clear.

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Senator Ted Kennedy (D-Massachusetts) drove his car off a bridge after attending a party on Chappaquiddick Island. His Passenger a young Miss Mary Jo Kopechne was killed in the incident. Kennedy pled guilty to leaving the scene, but denied that he was under the influence of alcohol. Negligent driving was considered the cause of Kopechne’s death.

The incident haunted Kennedy’s political career, and weakened his hopes of a run for the office of President of the United States. Some have taken the incident as another indication of a ‘Kennedy curse’ which has claimed so many of the American Royalty. Ted Kennedy is the brother of President John F. Kennedy

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The Bolshevik secret Police, known as the Cheka, murdered Tsar Nicholas II of Russia and his family. The Bolshevik Revolution had caused the Tsar to abdicate the previous year. This movement was led by Vladimir Lenin.

Nicholas II was killed along with his wife Alexandra; his son Alexei; his daughters Olga, Tatiana, Maria and Anastasia; and their servants. The murders occurred in Ipatiev House in Yekaterinburg. They woken early in the morning and taken to a basement room where a firing squad shot them. The women survived the bullets because of their clothing and were stabbed with bayonets and shot at close range in the head.

The bodies of most of the family were found in 1979. However the bodies of Alexei and Anastasia were not found until 2007. The Family was canonized as Russian Orthodox Saints.

July 17, 1955 Disneyland Theme Park Opens in California
Disneyland Park opened its gates to 28,000 people, half of whom entered using counterfeit tickets. The day was marked by numerous disasters including: heavy traffic, extremely high temperatures, a shortage of food, and a gas leak. For over a decade, Walt Disney and his executives referred to this day as “Black Sunday,” declaring that the official opening day was the following day, July 18.

July 17, 1955 Disneyland Theme Park Opens in California

Disneyland Park opened its gates to 28,000 people, half of whom entered using counterfeit tickets. The day was marked by numerous disasters including: heavy traffic, extremely high temperatures, a shortage of food, and a gas leak. For over a decade, Walt Disney and his executives referred to this day as “Black Sunday,” declaring that the official opening day was the following day, July 18.

July 16, 1951: J.D. Salinger sells a book with a creepy/rapey/molesty cover
Catcher in the Rye is Published
The novel, which was about a troubled 16-year-old named Holden Caulfield, exemplified common feelings of teenage angst and a resistance to growing up. The Catcher in the Rye became one of the most important English novels of the 20th century.
Photo: The Catcher in the Rye. London: Hamish Hamilton, 1951 (Library of Congress).

July 16, 1951: J.D. Salinger sells a book with a creepy/rapey/molesty cover

Catcher in the Rye is Published

The novel, which was about a troubled 16-year-old named Holden Caulfield, exemplified common feelings of teenage angst and a resistance to growing up. The Catcher in the Rye became one of the most important English novels of the 20th century.

Photo: The Catcher in the Rye. London: Hamish Hamilton, 1951 (Library of Congress).

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The Egyptian Village of Rosetta held one of the greatest historical artifacts in cryptography and was discovered by French Captain Pierre-Francois Bouchard.

Vastly important because its eventual use to decipher lost languages the tablet records a decree by Ptolemy V. The text known as the Memphis Decree was transcribed in 3 separate languages Egyptian Hieroglyphics, Demotic, and Ancient Greek.

"I went to the woods because I wished to live deliberately, to front only the essential facts of life, and see if I could not learn what it had to teach, and not, when I came to die, discover that I had not lived. I did not wish to live what was not life, living is so dear; nor did I wish to practice resignation, unless it was quite necessary. I wanted to live deep and suck out all the marrow of life, to live so sturdily and Spartan-like as to put to rout all that was not life, to cut a broad swath and shave close, to drive life into a corner, and reduce it to its lowest terms."

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Henry David Thoreau

Walden: Or, Life in the Woods

July 12, 1817 Henry David Thoreau was born in Concord, Massachusetts

todayinhistory:

July 11th 1804: Burr-Hamilton duel

On this day in 1804, Vice President of the United States Aaron Burr and former Secretary of the Treasury and Founding Father Alexander Hamilton had a duel. The two parties had to sail across the Hudson River into New Jersey, where laws on duels were more lax. Thus the duel took place at Weehawken in New Jersey. The duel saw Burr fatally shoot Hamilton, who died the next day. Burr was acquitted of murder but the incident ended his political career and President Jefferson dropped him from the 1804 election ticket. The duel was a culmination of years of political and personal disputes between the two men.

Source: todayinhistory

July 8, 1918 A 19-year old soldier named Ernest Hemmingway is wounded in battle in Italy. While in a Milan hospital recuperating he meets and falls in love with a nurse named Agnes Von Kurowsky. Agnes is the direct inspiration for several characters in Hemmingway’s work including Catherine Barkley in Hemmingway’s A Farewell to Arms.
To ruin the romanticism,but increase the sense of longing of this event: Von Kurowsky wrote to Hemmingway after he had returned to the U.S. saying she had become engaged to an Italian Officer. She left Italy unmarried entirely.

July 8, 1918 A 19-year old soldier named Ernest Hemmingway is wounded in battle in Italy. While in a Milan hospital recuperating he meets and falls in love with a nurse named Agnes Von Kurowsky. Agnes is the direct inspiration for several characters in Hemmingway’s work including Catherine Barkley in Hemmingway’s A Farewell to Arms.

To ruin the romanticism,but increase the sense of longing of this event: Von Kurowsky wrote to Hemmingway after he had returned to the U.S. saying she had become engaged to an Italian Officer. She left Italy unmarried entirely.

July 7, 1981 President Ronald Reagan appoints Sandra Day O’Connor to the Supreme Court. Associate Justice O’Connor is the first female member of the Supreme Court of the United States and is extraordinarily brilliant and poignant.
Check out several of the books about and by her on Amazon:
http://www.amazon.com/s?ie=UTF8&page=1&rh=n%3A283155%2Ck%3Asandra%20day%20o%27connor
I recommend Out of Order: Stories from the History of the Supreme Court http://www.amazon.com/dp/0812993926/ref=cm_sw_r_tw_dp_6nm1rb0MR51633J8

About the Author
Sandra Day O’Connor was born in El Paso, Texas, and raised on the Lazy B Ranch. She attended Stanford University, where she took Wallace Stegner’s writing course. She began her public service in Phoenix, and was majority leader of the Arizona Senate before becoming a judge. She is the author of Lazy B, a memoir about growing up in the Southwest, and The Majesty of the Law, a reflection on American law and life. President Reagan nominated her as Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States, and she served from 1981 to 2006. She serves as Chancellor of the College of William & Mary, and is on the board of trustees of the National Constitution Center in Philadelphia.


 

July 7, 1981 President Ronald Reagan appoints Sandra Day O’Connor to the Supreme Court. Associate Justice O’Connor is the first female member of the Supreme Court of the United States and is extraordinarily brilliant and poignant.

Check out several of the books about and by her on Amazon:

http://www.amazon.com/s?ie=UTF8&page=1&rh=n%3A283155%2Ck%3Asandra%20day%20o%27connor

I recommend Out of Order: Stories from the History of the Supreme Court http://www.amazon.com/dp/0812993926/ref=cm_sw_r_tw_dp_6nm1rb0MR51633J8

About the Author

Sandra Day O’Connor was born in El Paso, Texas, and raised on the Lazy B Ranch. She attended Stanford University, where she took Wallace Stegner’s writing course. She began her public service in Phoenix, and was majority leader of the Arizona Senate before becoming a judge. She is the author of Lazy B, a memoir about growing up in the Southwest, and The Majesty of the Law, a reflection on American law and life. President Reagan nominated her as Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States, and she served from 1981 to 2006. She serves as Chancellor of the College of William & Mary, and is on the board of trustees of the National Constitution Center in Philadelphia.