Running, Cycling, Climbing Trees, and Reading a Book While I'm Up There.

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Officially Confirmed on July 24, 1922, several more hurdles and treaties had to be signed for the British Mandate for Palestine officially went into effect. The League of Nations was responsible for the creation and confirmation of the document.

Formalizing British control over the Southern region of Ottoman Syria, the document was in effect until May 14, 1948. The document took control of the area from the now defunct Ottoman empire while creating the first vestiges of a Jewish homeland.

The mandate included Article 14 which specifically called for the creation of a council to review the religious status quo. Knowing the continued strife in the region it may not be surprising that the council was never created. Article 15 of the mandate basically functioned as a freedom of religion clause specifically stating “nothing should be done which might prejudice the civil and religious rights of existing non-Jewish communities in Palestine”. Again knowing the history of the region, it is not expected for the reader to be rolling their eyes.

I am tired

I am tired

Belly Rub

Belly Rub

I am Excited

I am Excited

Today I feel guilty.

Today I feel guilty.

Today I feel bored

Today I feel bored

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September 13, 1848 – The Amazing Case of Phineas Gage 
A Vermont railroad worker Phineas Gage survived a 3-foot iron rod being driven through his head and lived another 12 years. Gage was 25 at the time and was directing a work gang blasting rock to prepare the laying of railroad tracks. The tamping iron that was being used to compress charges to blast away rock struck a spark and was shot through his skull. This incident destroyed most of his brain’s left frontal lobe and caused drastic changes in his personality and behavior. The still cited incident caused new debate and discussion about the nature of brain function and its role in personality and behavior.

September 13, 1848 – The Amazing Case of Phineas Gage 

A Vermont railroad worker Phineas Gage survived a 3-foot iron rod being driven through his head and lived another 12 years. Gage was 25 at the time and was directing a work gang blasting rock to prepare the laying of railroad tracks. The tamping iron that was being used to compress charges to blast away rock struck a spark and was shot through his skull. This incident destroyed most of his brain’s left frontal lobe and caused drastic changes in his personality and behavior. The still cited incident caused new debate and discussion about the nature of brain function and its role in personality and behavior.

Its a bike day

Its a bike day

Today I feel hopeful

Today I feel hopeful